Thoughts on why Google Glass isn’t the answer

Many readers love the idea of Google Glass.

I don’t.

What’s more I can’t see the nerdy-looking face mounted computer taking off. Nor do I see Samsung’s Galaxy Gear watch gaining mainstream acceptance in the immediate future.

Wearable computers may have a future. They almost certainly do have a future.

Yet the first wave of devices is as remote from that future as the 1950s computers are from today’s smartphones.

I was struggling to fully articulate my thoughts on this until I read John Gruber’s Daring Fireball: Thoughts on Google Glass. I’ve already said in public Glass is unwieldy, ugly and overpriced. Gruber makes similar points.

However he goes on to say:

the problem isn’t the idea, it’s the actual execution. There are no points for being first to market with a bad product. It’s a cool lab demo that they’re presenting as a finished product.

Yes, that’s exactly the point I was groping for. Glass is like the Wright Brother’s first aeroplane, a neat demonstration of possibilities, but not ready for the market.

Get one by all means. Wear it and lose your friends if you must. Just recognise now that it’s a crude prototype.

2 thoughts on “Thoughts on why Google Glass isn’t the answer

  1. Ugly? Unwieldy? I’m sure you know these are your subjective opinions.
    Lose your friends? Talk about an overreaction. I have a pair, and have worn them on dozens of social outings with friends who didn’t know I had them or was going to wear them, and after 5 minutes of oh’ing and aww’ing, the evening went on as if nothing had changed. Nobody mentioned it again, nobody looked at it, and the first couple of times (when I was still self-conscious about wearing them), I’d ask if they were purposely ignoring the computer on my face, and almost always, the answer was that it didn’t bother them, they felt no need to anxiously look at it, or they’d forgotten it was there.

    It is most definitely a beta product, but people don’t react nearly as you make them out to. In fact, on numerous occasions when I’ve left the glass at home, yet bought my smartphone, people comment on the fact they prefer that I leave my smartphone behind and wear my glass instead.

Comments are closed.