Five must have free business apps for any device

Whether you use a smartphone, tablet, PC or all three here are five apps to give your business an immediate productivity boost. All are available for Windows, OS X, iOS and Android:

OneNote: Microsoft’s excellent note-taking app was an overlooked jewel for a decade. Now it is free.

OneNote looks and works like a paper notebook. You can use it to save all kinds of data: text, audio, pictures and video. It’s unstructured, you simply clip items and drop them anywhere on a OneNote page.

Once you’ve saved material you can organise your hoard in pages, sections and notebooks. Best of all you can sync notebooks across your devices, so you can find that essential piece of information on your phone when away from your desk.

Dropbox: There are many ways you can save files in the cloud. Dropbox is simple, reliable and completely independent of hardware or operating system brands. Store a file in Dropbox and it is immediately available wherever you have an internet connection. Many also use it to back up data.

Wunderlist: Dozens of apps aim to replace writing to-do lists on scraps of paper. Wunderlist scores as the best because it stays simple while adding enough extra functions to keep you on your toes. You can prioritise tasks, give yourself timed reminders and set up recurring items.

Pocket: Seen something worth reading online, but don’t have time to finish it now? Send a link to Pocket and read it later. it’s a great way to head off distraction when working I also use it when I see something on my phone, but the print is too small to read. A quick clip to Pocket means I can view it later on a bigger screen.

Skype: Plenty of alternatives products do voice or video calls and provide messaging services. I find Apple’s FaceTime works best when there’s decent connection at both ends. However, nothing works reliably across as many devices and operating systems as Microsoft’s Skype. You can chat, swap files, send txt messages and even call conventional phone lines.

IITP2013: Ed Robinson on taking an NZ tech business global

Apimize co-founder Ed Robinson says selling in a large market like the United States is not like selling in New Zealand. Sales people in Australia and New Zealand are generalists because our markets are small.

In the US, sales people specialise. They work narrow niches. A sales person there might only deal with, say, network security software for large financial services companies.

It’s a graphic illustration of the scale required. On the other hand, the scale of the opportunity is also huge. Robinson has been there. After building scale and selling to Silicon Valley, his Wellington-based business was snapped up by Riverbed for US$30 million in 2011.

Robinson relocated to California. This week he was back in New Zealand to share the lessons he learned at the IITP 2013 Conference in Tauranga.

Sales are key

Sales are key to going global. It sounds obvious, but Robinson says things only really took off when he moved from a technical role into dales. He says a company should aim to invest in the time taken to learn how to achieve repeatable sales while finding the first 100 customers. This process should take about six months. Once you’ve found 100 customers you can move to scale your business.

His advice is to start by identifying a single customer vertical market where customers face the same problem. Preferably you should target enterprise customers – that’s were there’s money although it can be difficult getting through their formal processes to the point where you get paid.

You should be able to respond to all customers with the same value proposition and deliver the same solution. Once you’ve settled on the right formula you can start repeating the sale as if you are following a script.

Fixing on a price strategy

Finding a price strategy is important. Robinson says there are six possibilities. Traditionally packaged software has been the most popular. The pay per use model works well if you’re selling content. He says you need to charge the same as others in the market if you take this approach.

Subscription is rapidly taking place of packaged software. The good side of the model is that you get recurring, predictable revenue and you start each month with as much revenue as the one before. Customers expect to pay relatively small amounts, go past $10 a month and consumers will resist. Enterprise customers are OK with subscriptions but prefer to pay annually – mainly because they face relatively high costs when making payments.

There’s no much control with the advertising model because it puts you at the mercy of the companies selling the ads. If Google changes its rates for Adwords, your income will change. With Freemium you should expect about one percent of users to pay for your product.

Offering a free product is only a temporary strategy and it requires deep pockets.

The trouble with marketplaces

Robinson says he is wary of marketplaces – like the Apple App Store or Google Play. He says they mainly exist for the benefit of the parent product. The companies running them need them to build their own momentum.

He has praise for the Kiwi Landing Pad in San Francisco and says many of the New Zealanders in the US are only too happy to help others succeed. Connections like this are important in the US, especially in Silicon Valley where success often depends on making contact with the right people

Aranz-Geo feted for software innovation on world stage

ARANZ-Geo-Use-geological-maps-and-GIS-data-to-create-faulted-geological-models.JPG.width_.730.ashx_

Aranz-Geo’s Leapfrog geological modelling software

Christchurch-based geological modelling software specialist Aranz Geo narrowly missed taking the top accolade at the 2013 New Zealand International Business Awards.

That prize, the supreme award, went to agri-test company Tru-Test. Aranz Geo received the first special commendation in the history of the awards.

Aranz Geo also won the ‘ANZ Best Business Operating Internationally – Under $10million’ category. Two years into its three-year place, the company saw revenue, profit and market share grow 300 percent. The number of software licences has tripled to 934 and the company now has thousands of users.

Award judges described the application of Aranz Geo’s technology to mining geology as revolutionary.

They say: “No other company is making similar software and after considerable scepticism ARANZ has now sold to all major global miners…its discipline speaks of a much bigger company and its Fort Knox client list is testament to that discipline. Its transformation has been nothing short of incredible”.

NZTE runs the awards and they are sponsored by ANZ.

Another specialist software business, Auckland-based Gentrack, took the prize for the best business operating internationally in the $10 million to $50 million category. Gentrack Velocity is a specialist billing, CRM and Meter Data Management product for energy and water utilities. Gentrack also sells an airport management system.