Briefly: Telecom & Huawei; ANZ cloud politics

  • A joint innovation programme between Telecom NZ and Huawei will see the telecommunications equipment giant tailor technologies for New Zealand conditions. Huawei Wireless president David Wang says it could mean developing products for sale elsewhere. He says “New Zealand has a very agile commercial environment which is quick to adopt new technologies and promote fresh thinking. This is what has made it such a hot bed for innovation, and that’s something we want to tap into.”
  • Wellington-based cloud and infrastructure consultant Ian Apperley says since the Australian election that country’s government has leap-frogged New Zealand in its “will and determination” to move services to the cloud. One interesting angle Apperley explores is the Australian government’s willingness to support domestic cloud service providers.
  • New rules at Twitter mean it is now possible to get direct messages from people you don’t follow. It could be useful for companies wanting to get whinges from customers without having to share their failings with the whole world. Otherwise, you’ll probably not choose to enable the feature which is switched off by default.

Briefly: Vocus opens AWS pipe; Fast 50; Twitter IPO

Vocus_Cloud_Connect_Auckland

Vocus Communications says Vocus Cloud Connect gives New Zealand businesses a secure, dedicated connection to Amazon Web Services in Sydney. The business-class service launched Thursday. It is pitched as an alternative to the public internet where Vocus says: “performance can often be slow, erratic and unpredictable.”

That, says Vocus CEO James Spenceley affects productivity, performance and staff morale. “Potentially offsetting any financial advantage expected when moving applications to the cloud”, he says.

The private fibre network scales with speeds ranging from 50 Mbps to 10 Gbps. Customers can choose either a dedicated physical port or a virtual port. There’s also a burstable service. This allows customers to burst above their committed speed as needed.

  • Wellington IT consultancy OptimalBI is one of a handful of IT consultancies to make it onto the Regional Deloitte Fast 50 index. Other technology companies to make the index include Auckland’s Snakk Media, Eroad and Unleashed Software. Cloud services provider LayerX is from the Central North Island, while GreenButton and Rocket Jump also represent Wellington. Canterbury has three tech companies on the index: Intranel, Trineo and Mars Bioimaging while Timely and Bookme represent the lower South Island.
  • Get ready for a media storm. Social media service Twitter is going for an IPO, some say it could be worth north of US$10 billion. The IPO is expected to happen early next year and will be closely followed – possibly as much as when Facebook went public.

Briefly: Intel’s Bay Trail, Gen-i scores Corys, Microsoft’s PR own goal, Twitter Australia

the-netbook-may-not-be-dead-yet-intel-talks-200-300-touch-enabled-bay-trail-laptopsIntel is due to take the wraps of its Bay Trail Atom processor next week. The chip aims to bridge the ever-narrowing gap between PCs and tablets, but the headline news is that it supports both Windows and Android. That means you can expect to see a slew of dual-boot devices able to switch quickly between the two operating systems.

Bay Trail uses 22nm technology. It promises the same low power consumption and long battery life that Intel delivered in the earlier Clover Trail processor, while doubling the performance.

From a user point of view the main story is that Intel’s new chip is likely to bring about a fresh wave of mobile devices with lower price points. Some US analysts expect to see tablets using the chips go on sale for as little as US$150.

The big danger Intel faces launching the new processor is that it will cannibalise the company’s Core range of processors used in traditional PCs. Maybe it will. In truth Intel has little option, the PC market is in a tail spin and Bay Trail offers a route out of a declining market. Bay Trail gives Intel a better chance of succeeding in the fast-growing mobile device sector.

 

  • Telecom NZ IT division Gen-i says it beat Vodafone to win a wide-ranging five-year contract with Corys Electrical. The deal includes trans-Tasman managed IP and WAN services linking 42 branches in New Zealand with the company’s data centre in Melbourne. Corys was already a Gen-i customer, this week’ deal is an extension of an existing relationship. The customer says being able to pool mobile call minutes across the organisation was a factor in awarding the contract.
  • A PR own-goal at Microsoft Australia sees journalist Stilgherrian banned from this year’s Tech Ed conference officially because of off-colour tweets from last year’s event. As Delimiter’s Renai LeMay points out, Stilgherrian can go over the top, but the ban looks over the top and causes Microsoft more problems than it solves.
  • Social media player Twitter opens an Australian office in Sydney which, sigh, is likely to run things for New Zealand too. The company also announced the appointment of Karen Stocks as the Australian managing director.

     

Twit Cleaner closes: we lose

TwitcleanerNew Zealand-developed Twit Cleaner has closed its doors. The online service made weeding Twitter contacts simple and quick.

When I reviewed it last year I described Twit Cleaner as seriously useful. That’s because it sorts potentially bad Twitter accounts into categories making decisions easier.

Developer Si Dawson explains why he closed Twit Cleaner in a goodbye blog post. It boils down to running out of the number of API calls his service can make to Twitter at any moment.

Sadly Dawson also blogs about the upgrades he would have made if the project continued. They sound great.

I first learnt about Twit Cleaner’s demise from Making Hay.

The Twit Cleaner – Twitter? It’s Not Fun Anymore.

 

Now Twitter is the newsroom

There’s an interesting story from Sacha Vukic at PostPrint on how Twitter can act as an entire newsroom for reporters on the move: Twitter more than a newswire, it’s a newsroom.

I particularly like the idea of using Twitter as a fact-checking tool. I sometimes do this myself when I stumble over ‘facts’ I’m not certain about.

She asks if social media news desks might appear at newspapers and online news organisations to deal with breaking news reporting.

In some ways this is already happening, journalists everywhere are pulling in leads and sources from social media. I just don’t think anyone has formalised the process yet. If you know otherwise, please get in touch.

10 best Twitter practices for Twitter for journalists

Writing at Reportr.net Alfred Hermida says most journalists approach Web 2.0 services like Twitter with a 1.0 mindset. He’s right, my personal bugbear is that many media organisations insist their reporters use Twitter as a broadcast media and not for dialogue.

Hermida, a journalism professor, looks at a list of best practices guidelines for journalists using Twitter. Top of the list are two I consider the most important:

  • Have a voice that is credible and reliable, but also personal and human
  • Be generous in retweets and credit others

Too often media tweeters come across as cold and impersonal. In some cases the Twitter accounts feel robotic, because that’s exactly what they are.

And media outlets are often the least generous when it comes to crediting sources. Perhaps they fear they’ll lose readers if they point them elsewhere. Of course, they will lose some traffic that way, but they’ll gain more in terms of credibility by being more open and generous.

Reportr.net » 10 best practices for Twitter for journalists.