Editors who don’t use Twitter undercut their pleas to innovate

Bill Bennett:

“Using Twitter doesn’t ensure that you’re embracing change and racing into the digital future. But refusing to use Twitter actively is a certain sign that you think change is someone else’s job.”

Buttry is writing here about journalists and journalism, but the sentiment applies to any other line of work involving communications.

Originally posted on The Buttry Diary:

baquet twitterEditors who aren’t active on Twitter tell their newsrooms that we don’t all have to change. Journalists who aren’t active on Twitter choose to remain or fall behind.

I’m late to this round of adiscussion that’s been going on intermittently since at least when I started advocating Twitter’s use by journalists in 2008. But I was tied upMonday when Mathew Ingram and some New York Times staffers discussed whether journalists need to use Twitter (on Twitter, of course). Ingramthen blogged about the issue. The discussion was prompted by Buzzfeed’s “Quick Tour Of The New York Times’ Twitter Graveyard,” which exposed and mocked some Times staffers for their weak presence on Twitter, including Executive Editor Dean Baquet, who has tweeted twice.

Baquet at least has a photo for his avatar. Buzzfeed’sCharlie Warzelshowed 13 Times staffers’ accounts with Twitter’sgeneric egg avatar, which is like shouting, “Someone

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Briefly: Telecom & Huawei; ANZ cloud politics

  • A joint innovation programme between Telecom NZ and Huawei will see the telecommunications equipment giant tailor technologies for New Zealand conditions. Huawei Wireless president David Wang says it could mean developing products for sale elsewhere. He says “New Zealand has an agile commercial environment which is quick to adopt new technologies and promote fresh thinking. This is what has made it such a hot bed for innovation, and that’s something we want to tap into.”
  • Wellington-based cloud and infrastructure consultant Ian Apperley says since the Australian election that country’s government has leap-frogged New Zealand in its “will and determination” to move services to the cloud. One interesting angle Apperley explores is the Australian government’s willingness to support domestic cloud service providers.
  • New rules at Twitter mean it is now possible to get direct messages from people you don’t follow. It could be useful for companies wanting to get whinges from customers without having to share their failings with the whole world. Otherwise, you’ll probably not choose to enable the feature which is switched off by default.