Editors who don’t use Twitter undercut their pleas to innovate

Bill Bennett:

“Using Twitter doesn’t ensure that you’re embracing change and racing into the digital future. But refusing to use Twitter actively is a certain sign that you think change is someone else’s job.”

Buttry is writing here about journalists and journalism, but the sentiment applies to any other line of work involving communications.

Originally posted on The Buttry Diary:

baquet twitterEditors who aren’t active on Twitter tell their newsrooms that we don’t all have to change. Journalists who aren’t active on Twitter choose to remain or fall behind.

I’m late to this round of adiscussion that’s been going on intermittently since at least when I started advocating Twitter’s use by journalists in 2008. But I was tied upMonday when Mathew Ingram and some New York Times staffers discussed whether journalists need to use Twitter (on Twitter, of course). Ingramthen blogged about the issue. The discussion was prompted by Buzzfeed’s “Quick Tour Of The New York Times’ Twitter Graveyard,” which exposed and mocked some Times staffers for their weak presence on Twitter, including Executive Editor Dean Baquet, who has tweeted twice.

Baquet at least has a photo for his avatar. Buzzfeed’sCharlie Warzelshowed 13 Times staffers’ accounts with Twitter’sgeneric egg avatar, which is like shouting, “Someone

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Briefly: Telecom & Huawei; ANZ cloud politics

  • A joint innovation programme between Telecom NZ and Huawei will see the telecommunications equipment giant tailor technologies for New Zealand conditions. Huawei Wireless president David Wang says it could mean developing products for sale elsewhere. He says “New Zealand has a very agile commercial environment which is quick to adopt new technologies and promote fresh thinking. This is what has made it such a hot bed for innovation, and that’s something we want to tap into.”
  • Wellington-based cloud and infrastructure consultant Ian Apperley says since the Australian election that country’s government has leap-frogged New Zealand in its “will and determination” to move services to the cloud. One interesting angle Apperley explores is the Australian government’s willingness to support domestic cloud service providers.
  • New rules at Twitter mean it is now possible to get direct messages from people you don’t follow. It could be useful for companies wanting to get whinges from customers without having to share their failings with the whole world. Otherwise, you’ll probably not choose to enable the feature which is switched off by default.

Briefly: Vocus opens AWS pipe; Fast 50; Twitter IPO

 

Vocus_Cloud_Connect_AucklandVocus Communications says Vocus Cloud Connect gives New Zealand businesses a secure, dedicated connection to Amazon Web Services in Sydney. The business-class service launched Thursday. It is pitched as an alternative to the public internet where Vocus says: “performance can often be slow, erratic and unpredictable.”

That, says Vocus CEO James Spenceley affects productivity, performance and staff morale. “Potentially offsetting any financial advantage expected when moving applications to the cloud”, he says.

The private fibre network scales with speeds ranging from 50 Mbps to 10 Gbps. Customers can choose either a dedicated physical port or a virtual port. There’s also a burstable service. This allows customers to burst above their committed speed as needed.

  • Wellington IT consultancy OptimalBI is one of a handful of IT consultancies to make it onto the Regional Deloitte Fast 50 index. Other technology companies to make the index include Auckland’s Snakk Media, Eroad and Unleashed Software. Cloud services provider LayerX is from the Central North Island, while GreenButton and Rocket Jump also represent Wellington. Canterbury has three tech companies on the index: Intranel, Trineo and Mars Bioimaging while Timely and Bookme represent the lower South Island.
  • Get ready for a media storm. Social media service Twitter is going for an IPO, some say it could be worth north of US$10 billion. The IPO is expected to happen early next year and will be closely followed – possibly as much as when Facebook went public.