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For several years now, the trend among geeks has been to abandon the RSS format. RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is a way to queue up and serve content from the internet.

Source: The Case for RSS — MacSparky

Geeks might not like RSS, but it’s an essential tool if you monitor news or need to stay up to date with developments in a subject area.

An RSS feed is a way of listing material that’s published online. There’s a feed for this site if you’re interested. It sends out a short headline and extract as each post is published. That way you can stay up to date with everything published here without needing to constantly revisit the site to check for updates.

Separate feeds

Some big sites break up their news rivers into separate feeds. At the New York Times or The Guardian you can choose to read the technology news feed. At ZDNet you can pick subject feeds or selected a feed for an individual journalist.

Sometimes you can also roll your own niche feeds from big sites by using a search term to get a list of all stories including a certain key word.

The beauty of RSS is that it is comprehensive. It misses nothing. If you go offline for a week you can pick up where you left off and catch up immediately.

RSS is comprehensive

The alternatives are social media sites like Twitter or Facebook. They are nothing like as comprehensive or as easy to manage. Tweets go flying past in a blur on Twitter.

All the main social media sites manage your feed. They decide what gets served up. This means you can miss important posts as they get pushed out of sight. That doesn’t happen with RSS.

In his story David Sparks says you need to be on Twitter all the time to catch news. Make that: you need to be on Twitter all the time AND staying more alert than most people can manage.

Universal feed

The other great thing about RSS is the format is so universal. It can be as simple as raw text. You can read it on your phone, tablet, computer or anywhere at any time. You can suck it out and place it on your own web site, for instance.

There are RSS readers built into browsers, mail clients like Outlook and other standard software. Or at least there were. I haven’t checked again lately. One of the most popular readers is Feedly. This is both a website and a series of free apps. You can pay a little extra to extra features such as an ability to search feeds, tools for integrating feeds into your workflows and so on.

The case for RSS was first posted at billbennett.co.nz.

Indieweb – why you should take more control of your online presence and how to use WordPress to do it.

What you post online should belong to you, not a corporation. That corporation can close shop or change its rules tomorrow: you may not be able to get at your own data.

Even if you can get at your data, you often have little control over who can see your posts and messages.

The IndieWeb is all about you keeping control over your posts and data. Think of it as a declaration of independence. It means you get to choose who can see your material where and when. The idea is to build a long- presence that big business interests can’t take away.

It doesn’t mean you have to walk away from Facebook, Twitter or any other service. It does mean you don’t need to be trapped in someone else’s walled garden.

Indieweb and WordPress

WordPress is an ideal open source tool for building a personal online presence. You don’t need to be a developer to use it. And the Indieweb is a great way to get more from a WordPress web site.

At the November WordPress meet up I’ll talk about the ideas behind the Indieweb. We’ll discuss the problems it solves. Then I’ll look at the WordPress themes, plug-ins and other tools to help make it work. I’ll also talk about my experience using them in practice and in my work as a journalist.

There will be plenty of opportunity to ask questions during the presentation and after.

Event details:

Duck Duck Go

For the last month Duck Duck Go has been my default search engine on my computers, tablets and phone. It’s not the first time I’ve tried this experiment.

Unlike other search engines Duck Duck Go doesn’t track your searches. You’ll see advertising based on your search terms, but they don’t relate back to earlier searches. Nor are they based on your recent web activity elsewhere.

This is a different business model to Google which attempts to build profiles based on your activity. Google doesn’t just track your searches; its tentacles are everywhere. By some estimates three-quarters of all websites report your habits back to Google.

Stalker

This explains why some advertisements stalk you as you navigate the web. In my case it can be surreal. I write about technology, so let’s say I research a story about software defined networking. If I do a lot of researching advertisements for SDNs can dog me for days after. They may drop off, then return later.

While a lot of people don’t care about privacy in this way, others are concerned.

The vast amounts of data Google collects are enough to identify an individual. Thanks to the ability to read most emails, Google knows where you live, what you do and can make assumptions about how much money you earn, what you spend and who you vote for.

Google reckons

Away from privacy, the Duck Duck Go approach has another advantage. Because Google thinks it knows about you and what you want, it uses your profile to send customised search results your way.

This can be useful. It can also be a problem. It means Google searches are not neutral. If I search for a certain term, I may not get the same answers as you.

This isn’t always helpful in my work as a journalist. If I’m doing background research I want the best quality information. There’s no way of knowing that Google’s filters give me that. With Duck Duck Go I would see the same result as you.

Duck Duck Go tricks

Duck Duck Go has a couple of tricks up its sleeve which I find helpful. Let’s say you want to know more about someone you meet on Twitter. Type their address into the search bar and you get a result like this:

Duck Duck Go social media search

The last time I tried Duck Duck Go, I found there wasn’t enough depth of coverage. In particular, it didn’t do a great job of finding New Zealand-specific material.

This hasn’t changed, or if it has changed, it hasn’t changed enough. It can still be frustrating to use at times. During the last month there have been few working days where I didn’t need to switch back to Google to handle a specific search.

Away from New Zealand searches, Duck Duck Go does well enough. It is better than before. One Google feature I miss is the ability to restrict the search to Google News. This is useful for getting straight to publications avoiding sites that are trying to sell things like, say, software defined networks.

Google often seems to be more interested in delivering me to sales outlets than information services. Duck Duck Go doesn’t have a news filter, so a search for SDNs means I have to wade through lots of sales sites to find more independent information. It would be great if a news search was an option.

Bang Bing

What the search engine does have is something called bangs. This is a shorthand way of restricting a search to a single site or organisation. So, if I want to look on Bloomberg for information about SDNs, I type:

!blmb software defined networks 

This doesn’t always work. My search shown here drew a blank. When I tried the same search using The Economist bang, the browser couldn’t open anything, not even a 404 page.

When I last wrote about Duck Duck Go, I mentioned that I returned to Google because… well it looked as if it was more efficient and finding what I need.

It often still is. Not all the time, but a lot of the time. It depends on what I’m searching for. At other times Duck Duck Go does a better job. The site uses data from Microsoft’s Bing search engine, which, can be just as disappointing.

Duck Duck Go still isn’t the best choice for most searches, but it is a more private choice.

They capture data and insights about us and will become irresistible to hackers.

Source: Why concerns about smart speakers are real – The Listener

Peter Griffin writes:

Let’s not kid ourselves – these smart speakers are not really about our convenience but capturing more data and insights about us as humans and consumers and channelling us to the various online services those tech companies control. That’s why Alexa made its debut and why Amazon made the Dot such a cheap device.

If this doesn’t scare you, then you haven’t been paying attention. Which is exactly what the big technology companies behind these speakers rely on.

George Orwell’s 1984 was a set book when I was at high school in the 1970s. At the time we write essays imaging a dystopian future where a totalitarian government would spy on its citizens. We may get there yet.

What Orwell and none of us worrying about privacy in the 1970s came close to grasping was that people would gladly buy the Big Brother snooping technology themselves. Nor did we imagine the main purpose of the snooping would be to find ways to fleece us.