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Explaining New Zealand’s Cloud Code

The April 2014 ANZ edition of Modern Infrastructure carries my New Zealand Cloud Code of Practice story. Modern Infrastructure is a free PDF magazine. You have to give the publisher an email address and personal details to download it. Once past that barrier you can  access all the material on the site. There’s plenty of interest for IT professionals so if infrastructure is your thing, it’s well worth the effort.

I wrote the story for an international audience. It came about because there’s a lot of overseas interest in the code. You may notice the subeditor turned the macro on the word  Māori into a tilde. Or perhaps the editor’s computer didn’t recognise the macron.

Most of the story is from an interview with Joy Cottle of the Institute of IT Professionals. She talks about how the code came about and the process of taking it from an idea to implementation.

It’s a pleasure to be able to tell the world a technology story where New Zealand is ahead of the pack.

Building trust in the cloud

New Zealand’s recently launched code of practice for cloud service providers sets out to increase trust between suppliers and potential customers, is being viewed with envious eyes overseas.

Sparsely populated New Zealand is thousands of kilometres from neighbours, which means it faces cloud barriers not seen elsewhere in the rich world. The population is small, a little over 4.5 million people. At this stage that’s not enough critical mass for global cloud players to make New Zealand a priority.

One of the biggest problems for New Zealand’s enterprises is trust issues when it comes to dealing with service providers located on the other side of the world. Addressing trust is one reason New Zealand’s Institute of IT Professionals (IITP), formerly the New Zealand Computer Society, developed a cloud computing code of practice. It is one of the first voluntary disclosure codes of its kind.

The Cloud Code, as it is known locally, is making waves around the region. Organisations in Australia and South East Asia are considering adopting it or something similar.

New Zealand’s Cloud Code gives service providers and customers a consistent, independent benchmark for practices, processes and ethics.

 

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