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mobile

Huawei Watch GT 2: A short take

The Huawei Watch GT 2 looks OK, has great battery life, is waterproof and has a slew of health features, but it can’t run third-party apps.

Huawei has a unique take on the idea of a smart watch. The company’s Watch GT 2 almost belongs in a different product category. It has its charms, but it is, well, not very smart.

There is little in common with, say, the Apple Watch, other than both are watch-sized computers that fit on the wrist.

For a start the Huawei Watch GT 2 looks nothing like the Apple Watch. It is round, like a non-smart watch. In most of its incarnations it looks like a conventional watch with hands ticking clock-wise around the watch face.

Plenty of battery life

Unlike Apple’s Watch, you can get two weeks from a single charge, although that time plummets when you use its music playing capacity.

I didn’t test this, but Huawei says the Watch GT 2 is waterproof enough to measure your swimming activity.

The biggest different between the Huawei Watch GT 2 and other smart watches lies in what it does. Or to be more accurate, what it doesn’t do.

If you have your phone nearby, you can make Bluetooth calls on the Watch GT. Huawei says 150 metres, in testing I found it struggling if the phone was 15 metres away.

Huawei Watch GT 2 is all about activity

The device will monitor your heart rate and track physical activity.

There’s a built-in GPS so you know where you’ve been. You can check emails, texts and calendar items, although you need good eyes to read off the tiny 46mm display.

That’s about it. Unlike other smart phones, it doesn’t run third party apps. Don’t even think about using the Huawei Watch GT 2 for something like checking onto an Air New Zealand flight.

You are stuck with the stock software with little room for customisation. It is what it is.

LiteOS

Huawei has opted to use something called LiteOS as the operating system. No, I’ve never heard of it either.

LiteOS is all about fitness and health tracking. At the launch function Huawei talked about the 15 different types of exercise activities the phone tracks. You can also track your sleep. It collects a lot of data.

In that sense LiteOS is fine, but limited. Let’s hope Huawei can do better if it has to deliver its own phone operating system.

Compared with smarter smart watches you get a lot of activity tracking and a ton of battery life. Depending on your taste you might also like how it looks. On the downside you can’t do anything like as much with it as with an Apple or Samsung watch.

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mobile review

Freebuds 3: Huawei pays homage to AirPods

Huawei’s Freebuds 3 look distinct from Apple’s Airpods. Presumably they are different enough to avoid knock-off litigation.

Yet there’s little question the Bluetooth wireless earphones with a charge box idea is cribbed from Apple.

Let’s be polite and say they pay homage to the original.

You can buy a pair in local stores for around NZ$260. This compares with the NZ$450 price of Apple’s Airpods Pro.

Freebuds 3 versus Airpods

It’s impossible to write about Freebuds without mentioning Airpods. So let’s stick with comparisons here, that’s the real story.

Both products are wireless earbuds that use Bluetooth to connect to devices. Both come with snappy little charging cases. More important, both have active noise cancellation.

If you own an iPhone or iPad, it’s likely Airpods will be your first choice. And why not? They are excellent. I wouldn’t be without mine.

Likewise, if you own an Android phone or you are allergic to buying Apple kit, there’s a good Freebuds are on your wish list.

The main exception to these cases is cash-strapped Apple owners might be drawn to the less expensive Huawei option.

Differences

Looking beyond price, there are a few significant differences between the products. The Freebuds 3 earpieces are more like those of the original Apple Airpods. That is, they sit in the outer ear.

The Airpods Pro have a snugger fit. This means the physical hardware does some of the work when it comes to cutting out external noise.

Huawei Freebuds 3
Huawei Freebuds 3 – Black is the new black

Physically the Airpods have a better look. For the New Zealand market the Freebuds come in a Darth Vader black version, although there is a Imperial Stormtrooper white option overseas. Apple’s wireless earbuds only come in white.

Latency advantage not obvious

Both products use their companies’ chip designs. Huawei claims lower latency, but in practice this, if it is true, is not noticeable. Both can automatically connect without the need to stuff around with Bluetooth settings.

Apple’s active noise cancellation is one-size-fits-all. You can tinker with the Huawei settings. I wouldn’t say one approach is better than the other, they are different.

Likewise, I struggle to say one sounds better than the other. The Freebuds seem to do a better job with electronic music, while I find the standard non-Pro Airpods handle classic and acoustic material better, but this is largely a matter of taste.

Apple’s wireless earbuds have better battery life, but not by much. One thing I like about Airpods is their wireless charging, but again this is not a deal breaker.

Taking everything in account, there’s not much in it. If you have an Apple phone and the budget choose Airpods. Huawei phone owners should go with Freebuds 3. Everyone else might as well toss a coin.

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mobile telecommunications

Huawei blacklist – A guide for everyday users

The US government has blacklisted Huawei. As a result Google has stopped providing and supporting the Android software used on Huawei phones. American chip makers can no long supply technology to Huawei. The Huawei blacklist is part of a wider trade dispute between the US and China. 

Does the Huawei blacklist mean I have to stop using my phone?

No. If you already have a Huawei it will carry on working as normal for now.

Could China be spying on me through my Huawei phone?

Don’t be silly. If you’re like the average Android phone user you already let Facebook, Google and others spy on you. They make money that way.

If China wanted to casually spy on you it could buy data from one of those companies. If you’re a serious intelligence target for Chinese agents they’re probably able to spy on you regardless of your phone’s brand.

Is my Huawei phone a security risk?

No more than any other Android phone. Android is more prone to malware and nasty stuff than other phones, but this changes nothing in that department.

Huawei has not always been the best at providing necessary software updates and security patches in the past. The company says it will go on supporting existing customers.

I was thinking of buying a Huawei phone…

That’s probably not a great idea although if sales slump you may be able to pick up a bargain.

If you buy a Huawei phone today you’ll get updates for the current version of Android. It’s most likely you’ll get upgrades for the next version. After that things start to get tricky.

At the moment we’re on Android Pie. The next version, Android Q is due in a few months. Huawei has had all the code for both of these.

The next version, R, should turn up in about 14 months. The way things stand today Huawei won’t get that code.

Without official support, you could be cut adrift from the Android mothership in as little as 14 months. Huawei says it will continue with security upgrades, but you may struggle to run some apps once R is mainstream.

What about other Chinese Android phone brands?

How much of a gambler are you? The recent Huawei blacklist is specific to one company, but it’s part of an escalating trade war between the US and China. If you count yourself as cautious, then wait to see how the dust settles before buying an alternative Chinese brand.

Isn’t Android supposed to be open source?

Only up to a point.

Android has a number of layers. At the top there’s Huawei’s own software overlay, that’s EMUI on the premium phones. There’s a service layer which connects to things like the Google Play store, Maps and Gmail.

There’s a low level layer that connects the operating system to the hardware. The underlying Android operating system, AOSP is open source. Huawei will still be able to use that. It will be updated as normal.

However, Google usually shares this code with favoured phone makers months before the code is made public. Phone makers pay vast sums for this.

The blockade means Huawei will now get the code on release day, so users may wait months for upgrades.

This is how AOSP works for many smaller Chinese phone makers. If you’ve tried one of those phones you’ll know the customer experience often leaves much to be desired.

Yet it’s also how Huawei’s Chinese phone business works, so the company already knows how to deal with the restrictions.

The real problem is with those services or those of us living in western countries. If Google makes changes there could be problems for existing phone users.

Will I be cut off from Google services?

No. At least not for the foreseeable future. You might not get any new services introduced from next year on.

Is any of this covered by the Commerce Act?

That’s a good question. The simple answer is you probably won’t be able to use the Commerce Act as a way of getting your money back if the phone goes on working as normal. Although there’s an interesting precedent that suggests otherwise.

In the longer term you may have a case if a lack of software updates means the phone is, in effect, rendered useless before a reasonable period of time. 

If this happens, it won’t matter if Huawei is no longer active in New Zealand (see below). The phone retailer is liable, not the manufacturer.

What does this mean for Huawei’s phone business in New Zealand?

It’s possible the spat between the US and China blows over in a few weeks and things will return to normal. If not, it will soon be hard for Huawei to sell phones here. Anecdotal evidence says customers are already avoiding the brand.

That’s a shame because Huawei makes some of the best Android phones. It is the number three phone brand here. While it may not always look like it, Huawei acts to keep Samsung and Apple competitive.

Phones account for about half of Huawei’s revenue worldwide. Half of its sales are in China where losing Google isn’t a problem. So a quarter of the company’s revenue is at risk.

On the other hand, no-one knows if Huawei make much, if any, profit from phone sales. The Huawei blacklist could lead to the company exiting the phone market outside of China. If that’s the case, it could be doing Huawei a favour.

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telecommunications

America isolates Huawei — dangerous move with few winners

President Donald Trump’s latest attack on Huawei did not come as a surprise.

Earlier this month the US banned American companies from using equipment made by firms that pose a risk to national security. Chinese technology giant Huawei wasn’t named. It wasn’t necessary. Everyone got the hint.

At the same time, the US government asked American firms to withhold technology from those companies.

Google pulls Android Support

In the most dramatic move to date, Google said last week it would no longer supply the proprietary parts of its Android mobile operating system to Huawei.

At the same time American chip makers said they have stopped supplying the company. It turns out Huawei has been stockpiling some parts in anticipation of this move.

There has since been a temporary halt on the parts supply ban for existing Huawei products. Parts for new sales, which for a technology company come around fast, are still banned.

Billions at stake

We don’t know how Huawei’s investors reacted to the news, the company is in private ownership.

We do know that if the ban stays it will cost American firms billions of dollars in years to come. It could shut them out of the world’s largest consumer market. That’s been reflected in the share prices of Huawei’s US suppliers.

Trump, and America in general has been ratcheting up the pressure on Huawei for the best part of a year.

Things kicked-off in earnest months ago. Then, American officials warned the world that Chinese spies might use Huawei’s network hardware and phones.

It’s a story Huawei has denied often since spying accusations first emerged in Australia some years ago. Huawei also denies it has links to Chinese military.

Intelligence threat

More recently America threatened to withhold intelligence material for any ally with Huawei hardware on their networks.

It would be easy to dismiss America’s attack on Huawei as mere protectionism. That’s a clear part of what’s going on. Trump has since suggested he could clear up this spat if China cuts a new trade agreement with the US.

There is no evidence Huawei uses its network to spy on behalf of the Chinese government.

There is no smoking gun. Huawei’s accusers have not managed to dredge up any plausible documented evidence.

That speaks volumes.

Where Huawei is a threat

Still, Huawei represents a risk. That’s because Huawei dominates the telecommunications hardware market like no other company.

Telecommunications is essential, critical and strategic. It is a key infrastructure. Without it commerce and finance grind to a halt. So does almost everything else. Telecommunications touches almost every aspect of modern life.

America has suggested that while there’s no evidence of Huawei spying, it could hold countries to ransom.

Should, say, relations with a country deteriorate enough, China’s government might insist Huawei shuts networks. That would be a crippling blow to any economy.

Trade repercussions

It’s possible, but unlikely. The long-term repercussions for Chinese trade would be disastrous. Even threatening this would be fatal. After all who would trade with a partner who behaves like that?

And anyway, a shut-down would escalate matters. It could even tip relations over the brink with some countries. China can be aggressive, but there is no sign it is looking for a war.

There is more pressing long-term economic risk to America and the West. For the first time in living memory a Chinese company holds the key to an important, must have technology.

5G mobile

Huawei leads the way in 5G mobile telecommunications. Its technology is months, if not years, ahead of its rivals. The company has been the driving force behind the move to 5G for the past four or five years. Until the latest US intervention, it looked like Huawei would stay out in front.

A lot of the words and projections for 5G are hype. Yes it means more wireless bandwidth, but it is no more transformational than 4G or 3G.

Even so 5G is set to become a vital component of every country’s critical infrastructure. It’s not only about voice calls or web surfing. The technology is able to control power networks, sewage and logistics.

Huawei dominating this technology puts it in a very powerful position. By extension this could extend to China. The fear is the country could call in its favours from its home grown technology success story.

Technological dominance

We seen this kind of technology-lead dominance before. IBM was, in effect, the entire computing market until the late 1960s. It stayed in control of the sector until the 1980s. After that time Microsoft Windows and Intel processors defined the PC era.

In part these technologies contributed to America’s economic and technological pre-eminence. They helped America assert and project military power on a hitherto unseen scale.

There’s a fear Huawei and China could do the same1. Older readers may remember America had similar fears about Japanese technology. It appeared to pull ahead during the 1980s. The difference there was that Japan was never a military rival. 

Huawei already accounts for about a third of all telecommunications network hardware. Until recently it was on a growth trajectory. There is no reason to think that without intervention that proportion could climb to IBM or Microsoft levels of monopoly control.

Yet this frightens strategic thinkers in the US and other western nations.

Part of their concern is they worry about what it might mean for their industries if a Chinese company dominates a strategic market. They know how powerful this can be.

Embargoes

The US has often embargoed key technology product sales to out-of-favour countries. Indeed, an early chapter in the current Huawei spat came when the US accused it of violating Iran trade sanctions.

All this means Huawei doesn’t need to install backdoors in its 5G network hardware to be a threat. Not does it need to push out malicious code during software updates. There is no kill switch, but even if there was, it would be unnecessary. 

Huawei prepared for the US action. It stockpiled essential parts. It has its own mobile operating system under development and has worked to decouple its supply chains from the US.

Google that!

It’s hard to see how Huawei can stay competitive in phones without access to new Google software. It needs to offer Google search, Google Maps and other services that are now off limits. Chinese customers might live without them, customers in other markets demand and expect these services.

Huawei may stay competitive in network equipment in markets where it is still welcome. It may need US chips and software. China could, in theory either develop its own or source both elsewhere. That’s assuming the US doesn’t lean hard on other countries.

At this point things can go one of two ways. If it’s about the US putting trade pressure on China, things could blow over, albeit with some damage.

Huawei knock-out?

That’s the optimistic view. A more negative view is that America aimed to knock out China’s most prestigious technology company. It did so either to make a point or to stop Huawei from becoming too powerful.

This can backfire. China is powerful, rich and smart. America may have a more advanced software industry. It’s chip makers may be better, but China could view this as a wake up call to bolster its own industries.

Only a brave person would bet on China not catching up if it puts its shoulder to the wheel. America may have created the monster it had hoped to strangle at birth.

Disclaimer Huawei has flown me overseas three times in the last five years. I aim to take a balanced view of this story, but I’m only human. If you think I’m missing anything important feel free to comment.


  1. This argument forgets the UK government revelation that Huawei’s network software is a shambles. ↩︎
Categories
mobile

Apple hit hardest as phone sales fall

Research company IDC reports that year-on-year phone sales dropped 6.6 percent in the first quarter of 2019. It’s the sixth quarter in a row to see a drop and the rate of fall is picking up. This time last year sales were down 4.1 percent over the same time in 2017.

Samsung remains the leading phone brand albeit with a falling market share. It has been the top-selling brand for each of the last four quarters. During that period Apple jockeyed for second place with Huawei. The Chinese phone maker is now back in second place.

It’s been tough for everyone. Only two of the top five brands sold more phones in the last 12 months than in the earlier twelve months. Huawei and Vivo, which is not visible in New Zealand, both saw sales increase.

Samsung in the driving seat

Samsung accounts for about one phone in five sold. It’s share nudged down a tick as it sold 6.3 million fewer phones than in the previous year. While the company’s premium phone models, notably the Galaxy S10 and S10+, remain popular, Samsung is losing ground lower down the market.

Huawei is the big winner. The company continued its surge that has propelled it past Apple in terms of unit sales. Year on year sales are up 50 percent. In the twelve months to March 2019 Huawei moved to 19 percent market share. That is closing on Samsung’s 23 percent and comfortably in front of Apple’s 12 percent.

This strong growth took place before sales of the recently announced P30 and P30 Pro models could influence numbers. Based on a comparison of the P30 Pro and the Samsung S10 , Huawei may get nearer to Samsung’s share in the coming months.

Worldwide phone shipments

Company1Q19 vol1Q19 share1Q18 vol1Q18 sharechange
1. Samsung71.923.1%78.223.5%-8.1%
2. Huawei59.119.0%39.311.8%50.3%
3. Apple36.411.7%52.215.7%-30.2%
4. Xiaomi25.08.0%27.88.4%-10.2%
5. Oppo23.17.4%24.67.4%-6.0%
5. Vivo23.27.5%18.75.6%24.0%
Others72.123.2%91.927.6%-21.5%
Total310.8100.0%332.7100.0%-6.6%
Figures from IDC, numbers in millions

Apple phone sales fall

Apple’s four percent fall in market share represents something of a sea-change, but is not as dramatic as it is viewed in some quarters. The company’s share price actually rose after it announced its annual results overnight. Apparently iPhone sales were not as dire as expected. The company aims to make up some of the lost revenue from selling services.

We don’t see much of the fourth and fifth brands in New Zealand. Samsung and Apple dominate the New Zealand market with Huawei challenging for a place at the top table. After that, it’s all rats and mice.

For the record Xiaomi’s market share dropped almost half a percent to eight percent. Vivo added two percent of market share taking it to 7.5 percent. Oppo, which is active in New Zealand, was flat and is now in sixth place with a 7.4 percent market share.

Most of the analysts commenting on the results focused on the way consumers are no longer as quick to upgrade phones to the latest models. This makes a lot of sense. A phone should last from three to four years and, advances in photography aside, today’s phones are often not much better than three-year old models.

When new people enter the phone market, they are no longer coming in at the top, but are buying lower priced models from Chinese brands.