Categories
telecommunications

Fibre network done, now transformation

Writing at the Spinoff, consultant Rohan MacMahon worries about the impact of New Zealand’s recently finished fibre network.

He says: “New Zealand leaves Australia for dust on internet speeds and our children are practically born using fibre, but major challenges lie ahead.

MacMahon does was part of the Crown Fibre Holdings team that oversaw the UFB network build. (CFH is now Crown Infrastructure Partners).

MacMahon’s point is that despite New Zealand’s broadband network being the envy of other nations, we’re not doing enough with it.

Or at least not yet.

Transformation missing in action?

The nub of his argument is: “UFB was supposed to be about transformation, not just watching Netflix in 4K or admiring the result of your internet speed test.”

It would be wrong to say that has been no transformation. Although the transformation we have seen is not what MacMahon has in mind.

UFB transformed the telecommunications and entertainment sectors. This was always part of the plan. Both sectors have seen unprecedented disruption.

Sky and Vodafone are different beasts now we have a fibre network. TVNZ is getting there. The change at what used to be called Telecom is more dramatic. Telecom is now Spark and Chorus. Spark now competes with Sky in entertainment.

None of the UFB architects anticipated Netflix, Lightbox, Sky Now or Disney’s foray in streaming video.

Competition

Most of all, the telecommunications sector is far more competitive. UFB flattened the playing field. This has had knock-on effects.

Competition means people and businesses now spend less on telecommunications. They get far better services in return. Even customer support has improved.

We have faster broadband and unlimited data plans. Today, cost is less of a barrier to trying new things.

There’s no hidden charge for going over your data cap if you want to move data to the cloud. Likewise using video-conferencing won’t bust your cap. We can experiment without fear of a cost blow out.

Abundant data

Abundant data and reliable fast broadband make a difference.

There’s a clear projectivity gain, although it is hard to put a dollar value on it. At a guess, the financial benefits already outstrip the cost of building the network.

Sure, none of this is transformational for the public, but it is a huge benefit.

The problem with words like transformation is we look for it in the wrong places. We expect obvious, observable cause and effect when often the changes is more subtle, maybe too subtle to see.

Cause and effect

It’s not an ideal comparison, but no one anticipated the emergence of fish and chips when entrepreneurs built Britain’s rail network.

Railways made fast fish delivery to inland towns possible. Overnight ordinary people had access to better1 and cheaper food.

Railways ran to a timetable. Which spawned a need for clocks and watches so people could meet trains on time. Before long people realised they could commute to work and live further from city centres.

None of this was thought about when the railways were built.

We didn’t anticipate online media and advertising or streaming when the internet first appeared.

Hidden transformation

It’s possible the transformational effects of fibre are already happening. We can’t see them yet. Or maybe the network has to hit a critical mass before transformation kicks in. Either way, we’re going to get more than “Netflix in 4K”.

MacMahon’s other point is a bigger concern.

He says: “We also have a stubborn problem with digital inclusion. A lot of Kiwis don’t use the internet much or at all, particularly those who are older, rural, Māori, Pasifika, on low incomes, or have disabilities. In the 2018 census, 211,000 households (13 percent) stated they do not have internet access at home.

“It’s clear that lack of access to broadband is a diminishing issue. The main challenges are now affordability of broadband, motivation to use the internet, trust (for example in e-commerce) and skills. The government is still working on building a comprehensive blueprint to close the digital divide. In the meantime, many of the current initiatives are underfunded and sub-scale.”

Challenges

Yes. Big challenges indeed.

The cost of broadband has fallen in relative terms since the UFB project started. So has the cost of a device needed to access the network. This helps, but not enough.

When I wear my optimistic hat, I think we’re onto these challenges. There are useful initiatives. I know it concerns Kris Faafoi, the communications minister. If anyone can find a solution, he will.

In my darker moments I fear the problem is harder than we, as a nation, imagine. It may not even be about money.

The problems Spark encountered helping customers watch the Rugby World Cup show the digital divide is not just about the financial haves and have nots. There’s a skills gap and an information gap. Bridging all three is the challenge.

As an aside, I know only the first stage of the fibre network is done. Any other headline would have been too long. This isn’t the Daily Mail online. 


  1. Trust me, fish and chips was a diet upgrade at the time ↩︎
Categories
computing

NZ Tech Podcast – Netflix woes, Spark flicks Morepork, how Microsoft Teams challenges Slack

I’m Paul Spain’s guest on the New Zealand Tech Podcast this week. We talk about Spark selling its Morepork security business to ADT and how Netflix is struggling with content deals.

Elsewhere I describe Elon Musk as a Bond villain in the segment discussing Neuralink.

Also in the podcast: NZ drone rule update refresh, mobile-only streaming offering in India, FaceApp, Microsoft highlighting nation-state attacks, Huawei staying in headlines and why Apple may acquire Intel’s Modem business.

You can find the NZ Tech Podcast at all the usual places including the Tech Podcast webpage.

Direct link:

https://dts.podtrac.com/redirect.mp3/audio.simplecast.com/8e2abedf.mp3?aid=embed&rid=156401120037216924921

Categories
media telecommunications

Football deal highlights Spark Sky TV threat

It’s no coincidence Sky TV reported a $240 million loss days after Spark won the Premier League Football rights. A thread connects the two news stories.

Spark is New Zealand’s rising media power. Sky is still number one, but fading.

You can’t blame Sky’s problems on Spark’s football win. The traditional pay-TV company hasn’t owned Premier League rights for five years now. Yet the move underscores the shift from old school television technology to streaming media.

Football key to sport portfolio

The English Premier League joins Spark’s growing TV portfolio.

The telco, yes Spark is still mainly a telco, also has the local rights to Manchester United TV. On the team’s current form that may not be much to write home about. Even so it’s a sound investment. United is the best know and most followed English club outside of the UK.

Spark says it plans to wrap the two football deals into a new standalone sports media business. Spark already has the rights to next year’s Rugby World Cup.

The company has hinted there is still more to come. Sky TV doesn’t have the clout, or the money, it once had. So Spark has an opportunity to prise other popular sports away from the incumbent. If nothing else, New Zealand Netball and Cricket must be possible candidates. And perhaps various motor sports.

Sky FanPass

This is not great news for Sky. But there are chinks of light among the dark. The pay TV broadcaster cut a deal allowing Spark to resell its FanPass service.

Fanpass is now another small, but nicely done plank in Spark’s sports media portfolio. It also means Sky gets to tap a market that it has previously struggled to reach.

Let’s not forget LightBox. Spark’s streaming TV operation may be a pale imitation of Netflix, but it’s a useful value-add for Spark’s broadband business.

Another useful add-on for Spark is that it offers cut-price Netflix to customers signing for long broadband contracts.

Sticky TV

All-in-all Spark already has enough media properties to keep viewers glued to its broadband services. And that’s a critical part of the company’s TV-over-internet strategy: customers who buy a bundle of services are less likely to decamp to a rival broadband service.

Premier League football isn’t New Zealand’s most popular sporting code by a long shot. However, it has particular value for Spark. First, it tends to be watched by relatively well-heeled fans who are willing to pay a couple of hundred dollars or so for a year’s worth of games.

Second, Premier League fans are well used to watching games using streaming. It was the first major sporting property to be picked up by a digital organisation. That was Coliseum Sports Media which had the rights from 2013 to 2016. Spark works in a partnership with Coliseum before BeIn Sport won the rights.

Overseas moves

In a media statement Spark managing director Simon Moutter say his company developed its plan after looking at overseas sports content media moves.

He says: “We’ve carefully considered the different models and will be looking to replicate the good things other businesses have done and learn from the challenges they’ve had — all the while thinking carefully about how sports media fits in a New Zealand context”.

Spark says it will launch its own sport ‘platform’ early in 2019 and will annouce pricing and package deals closer to the launch.

Latch

Spark Sport head Spark hired Jeff Latch to head the Spark Sport operation. He will oversee buying more content rights and will take charge of the ‘platform’. Latch was previously director of content at TVNZ. In that role he was in charge of buying content, including sport. Spark is partnering with TVNZ for the Rugby World Cup project.

Latch says Spark will work with a specialist sports-streaming company. He says the platform used will be different from the one used by Spark’s Lightbox service.

He also said Spark intends its sports media operation to work as a standalone business and not be used merely as a way to woo broadband or mobile customers. To a degree this is what Spark has done with Lightbox.

Netflix close to two million NZ viewers

Had Sky merged with Vodafone it may have fought off the challenge from Spark, although that’s far from certain. Yet nothing could protect Sky from its other threat: Netflix.

Roy Morgan research says Netflix now has nearly two million viewers in New Zealand. The service saw subscription numbers grow 35 percent in the last year to reach 1.9 million viewers. The research company goes on to report:

“Now over three million New Zealanders have access to some form of Pay or Subscription TV, up 13.9 percent on a year ago. The growth in Pay and Subscription TV is being driven by the likes of Netflix along with a suite of rival streaming services including Lightbox, Sky TV’s Neon and Amazon Prime Video.”

Viewer numbers are growing slower for Sky TV’s Neon service. It was up 1.7 percent in the year to reach a total of 1.6 million viewers. Lightbox is the second most popular video on demand servide with 830,000 users. That’s up 43 percent on last year, growing faster than Netflix. Vodafone TV has 295,000.

Categories
telecommunications

Spark, Netflix a well-timed marketing promotion

There’s no comparison between Spark’s Netflix promotion the and the halted Vodafone-Sky deal.

One would have changed New Zealand’s telecommunications and media scene. The other is a marketing promotion.

Clever, perhaps. Timely, yes. But still marketing.

Netflix credit

Spark customers signing a two-year broadband contract will get a one-off credit on their Netflix subscription.

The deal only applies to unlimited data plans and is equal in value to a year’s standard Netflix subscription.

Netflix’s standard package costs $15 a month in New Zealand. The deal means Spark customers get a $180 credit against their Netflix bill to use as they choose.

Spark unlimited plans start at $105, so customers spend $2500 to get $180 worth of Netflix.

In money terms that’s less generous than the discounts some other ISPs offer. But Netflix is a magic name in the online media business.

While it is an aggressive move with the right video service, it’s not strategic.

The right video brand

Netflix is the big name in streaming TV and movies. It’s the brand everyone wants.

Spark needs a high profile deal to tie restless consumers to its brand.

Spark will continue to offer its own Lightbox online service as well.

The deal timing is interesting. It comes after the Commerce Commission turned down the proposed Vodafone-Sky merger. If that deal had gone through, it would be a handy face-saver for Spark which was wrongfooted by Vodafone.

Either way it underlines how telcos look to value-added services to sell their, otherwise, dumb pipes.

The telecommunications market rebooted after Telecom shed Chorus to win UFB contracts. At the time, most industry insiders expected the big players to compete on quality of service.

That never happened. No-one argues the big broadband companies offer anything other than indifferent customer service.

Adding value

Instead Vodafone and Spark sought other ways to compete. The game moved to adding value.

In Spark’s case the value-add includes home security and earlier attempts at bundling video entertainment. Spark dipped its toe in the media water with Lightbox and an investment in Coliseum Sports Media.

Vodafone has a partnership with Sky to do the same thing. The two companies may still reach a merger agreement.

At this stage the deal between Spark and Netflix is looser than any of the above. It’s just about marketing. Yet it gives Spark an opportunity to link its name with the biggest online media brand. Think of the move as a show of intent.

“Content provider”

Jason Paris, Spark Home Mobile and Business CEO talks of an ambition to become New Zealand’s preferred content provider. He says: “This partnership is a step on the road toward Spark becoming a go-to destination for media and entertainment.”

Maybe. But offering low-cost Netflix to customers already spending a lot of money doesn’t not make one a “go-to destination”. At best it makes Spark a deal broker.

For a media and entertainment to work in New Zealand Spark has to sharpen its act when it comes to bidding for sports rights. That means Rugby, lthough a tempting bundle of other popular sports including Cricket, Netball and Football might swing it.

Offering Netflix is a step in the right direction and a useful hey-look-over-here while a rival is in the spotlight. It’s not a strategy.

Writing at the NZ Herald Holly Ryan reports Sky is not happy about the Spark-Netflix deal

Categories
media

Global Mode: No winners, only losers

King CanuteCallPlus backed down. From September it will stop providing Global Mode. The service allows customers to hide their whereabouts. That way they can buy low-cost streaming video services direct from the US, UK or elsewhere.

In return the big media companies halted legal action against CallPlus.

Among other things they claimed Global Mode breached the Copyright Act and the Fair Trading Act.

That won’t be tested in court. We’ll never know if Global Mode was legal or not. That’s a pity because it leaves important questions unanswered.

Plenty has been written elsewhere (and by me) on what is a rearguard action against new digital distribution models.

This was always going to end badly for the big media companies, even if they won the Global Mode action.

That’s in part because Global Mode was a local version of something consumers can buy elsewhere.

While the King Canute media companies have stopped a wave, they haven’t stopped the tide.

There’s something else.

Globle Mode looked legitimate

Regardless of the untested legal arguments, Global Mode looked like a legitimate way of bypassing content geo-blocking. Consumers who used it felt they were doing the right thing. They were buying media.

It has taken the media business decades to convince consumers they should pay for media and not use shady operations like Pirate Bay.

And for a while they were.

Overnight, the big media companies have closed that channel. Consumers addicted to the latest shows, to entertainment not available from officially sanctioned New Zealand distributors have nowhere else to turn.

Some will lose interest. Others will head back to illegal channels.

That is not a victory for media companies.