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Every year throws up a long list of news stories, product launches and events. This year was better than most. Here are six 2019 stories that resonated with me. It’s a personal, unordered list and it’s written from a New Zealand perspective. You may have other highlights. Feel free to share them in the comments below.

Apple AirPods Pro

Apple AirPods Pro

Apple used a busy, noisy Auckland cafe to show off the AirPods Pro. By the time they hit New Zealand there was already an excited buzz about the noise cancelling ear buds. I expected a positive experience.

Even so, the sound quality was surprising. It wasn’t only the active noise cancelling, although that’s impressive enough. The AirPods sound is accurate. It doesn’t seem possible that something so small could sound so good.

My review says Airpods Pro offer affordable noise cancelling. I recommend you read this.

Samsung galaxy foldSamsung Galaxy Fold

Until 2019 it had been a long time since I left a product demonstration with a smile on my face. Then it happened twice in a short period. First with the Apple AirPods Pro, then a second time with the Samsung Galaxy Fold.

The price tag is be north of three grand (NZ$3400). Samsung’s first generation folding phone is a touch more fragile than I’d like. Yet here is the first major breakthrough in handset design since Apple’s first iPhone. Samsung has broken the mould and come up with real innovation.

Samsung’s Galaxy Fold is less a phone, more a small tablet that you can fold and carry in a pocket. You might even see it as a pocket computer. Either way, it is beyond impressive.

When folded it is a long slim phone, a little thicker and heavier than we’ve come to expect. Unfolded it is about the size of an iPad Mini and does much the same job.

Huawei showed its folding phone earlier at Mobile World Congress. A brief look confirmed it was a contender. So far, only one of the two models on show in Barcelona has made it to market in New Zealand.

No doubt there will soon be more, better folding phone designs. I’d love to see what Apple can do with this format: how about an iPhone that morphs into an iPad?

But for now, this is Samsung’s triumph.

César Azpilicueta

Spark Sport, Sky Sport Now

Spark Sport’s Rugby World Cup service came in for flak and some cruel media attention. That’s what you get for interfering with New Zealand’s favourite sporting code.

In my experience the streaming service worked fine during the RWC. I’ve racked up well over a hundred hours with the app. A lot of that was watching Premier League football1.

There have been hiccups, yet it is better experience than the BeIN service it replaced. My only gripe was I enjoyed the preview shows and the run-up coverage before big games on BeIN. Spark offers less of that. Also, half time is not so much fun without pundits.

Spark’s entry into streaming sport services has seen Sky lift its game. The new Sky Sport Now app has 12 channels of sport around the clock.

Sky Sport Now has excellent cricket coverage. It fills the European and international football gaps left by Spark. Most of the time there are enough channels to cover every game. Although there was one Champion’s League round where my team, Chelsea, only showed up as a replay later in the day.

I’m not complaining. The service is excellent. It’s good to see Spark and Sky compete by offering the best customer experience. It would be great if we had more of this kind of competitive tension.

The two streaming sport options are great value. Buying Sky Now and Spark Sport works out less each month than an old-style subscription to Sky’s satellite service. By my reckoning, there’s a broader selection of content to watch. That’s a win.

Deebot Ozmo 900 with Howl Bennett

Deebot Ozmo 900

Robot vacuums aren’t new. The Deebot Ozmo 900 updates the idea. It offers mopping as well as vacuuming. I had low expectations before I saw it in action. It impressed me once we used it. This is the only way to go.

The best part about the Ozmo 900 is that it’s low-slung body can get under beds, cupboards and tables. These are places where manual vacuuming gets hard. Another great aspect is, because it does all the work, you can vacuum more often keeping the house cleaner.

Ozmo 900 is a long way from the Androids science fiction writers promised for 2019. The good news is we don’t need to hire bladerunners to take them out when we’re done with them.

Auckland's first fibre
Steven Joyce installing Auckland’s first UFB cable – Albany – 24 August 2011

UFB: end of part 1

In the end builders finished the national UFB fibre network on time and under budget. That’s rare for a major infrastructure project and unusual given the project length. Read how the project started in The Download.

For me one of the clearest signs the original UFB project succeeded is that government found more money to connect another 169 areas. The so-called UFB2 takes coverage to around 85 percent of the country.

Another clear sign of success was Spark’s decision to stream Rugby World Cup coverage.

Next year, Chorus and central North Island fibre company UFF will offer 2Gbps and 4Gbps fibre. We’ve come a long way from ten years ago. Then a 30mbps fibre service looked like the last word in modern data communications.

Vodafone 5G

The Vodafone giant awakes

In recent years it seemed as if Vodafone’s New Zealand operation wasn’t going anywhere. In part this was because the parent company felt it had better things to invest in than the second telco in a small, remote country.

That changed in May. Infratil and Brookfield Asset Management took control in a $3.4 billion deal. Chief executive Jason Paris wasted no time getting the new owners to free up capital. This let Vodafone steal a march on Spark and get a sizeable 5G network running. Vodafone switched 5G on earlier this month.

There has also been an investment in customer support. That’s something that was an embarrassment in the past.

These initiatives are important, yet there’s more to the change. It’s as if Vodafone has had a vitamin injection. Now there is an energy to the business that wasn’t there before. It helps that Paris recruited fresh talent to senior positions, but it goes beyond that. It is as if the company has awoken from a slumber.

What it means in practice is that Spark faces greater competitive pressure than it did 18 months ago. Likewise the next tier of telcos; 2degrees, Vocus and so on, are also feeling the heat. Ten years after government restructured the industry we are seeing the competition those moves aimed to unleash.

Christchurch call

Six of the biggest tech moments of 2019 are positives. The seventh is also a positive, but it’s a positive that came about because of an horrific negative.

In May Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke at the Christchurch Call summit in Paris. It was a response to the Christchurch mosque shootings. The terrorist shooter filmed his crimes, streaming them online in real time.

The summit attempts to force social media companies to take more responsibity for material they publish. During the year, 48 countries signed an agreement to stop social media publishing terror messages. The US didn’t sign.

It isn’t clear if the initiative will work. Yet it is a first step towards wrestling control of online media away from the murderers and criminals who use it as a weapon. I suspect there is more to do, but the longest of journeys starts with a single step.


  1. It could be more than 200 hours, I’m not counting ↩︎

Writing at the Spinoff, consultant Rohan MacMahon worries about the impact of New Zealand’s recently finished fibre network.

He says: “New Zealand leaves Australia for dust on internet speeds and our children are practically born using fibre, but major challenges lie ahead.

MacMahon does was part of the Crown Fibre Holdings team that oversaw the UFB network build. (CFH is now Crown Infrastructure Partners).

MacMahon’s point is that despite New Zealand’s broadband network being the envy of other nations, we’re not doing enough with it.

Or at least not yet.

Transformation missing in action?

The nub of his argument is: “UFB was supposed to be about transformation, not just watching Netflix in 4K or admiring the result of your internet speed test.”

It would be wrong to say that has been no transformation. Although the transformation we have seen is not what MacMahon has in mind.

UFB transformed the telecommunications and entertainment sectors. This was always part of the plan. Both sectors have seen unprecedented disruption.

Sky and Vodafone are different beasts now we have a fibre network. TVNZ is getting there. The change at what used to be called Telecom is more dramatic. Telecom is now Spark and Chorus. Spark now competes with Sky in entertainment.

None of the UFB architects anticipated Netflix, Lightbox, Sky Now or Disney’s foray in streaming video.

Competition

Most of all, the telecommunications sector is far more competitive. UFB flattened the playing field. This has had knock-on effects.

Competition means people and businesses now spend less on telecommunications. They get far better services in return. Even customer support has improved.

We have faster broadband and unlimited data plans. Today, cost is less of a barrier to trying new things.

There’s no hidden charge for going over your data cap if you want to move data to the cloud. Likewise using video-conferencing won’t bust your cap. We can experiment without fear of a cost blow out.

Abundant data

Abundant data and reliable fast broadband make a difference.

There’s a clear projectivity gain, although it is hard to put a dollar value on it. At a guess, the financial benefits already outstrip the cost of building the network.

Sure, none of this is transformational for the public, but it is a huge benefit.

The problem with words like transformation is we look for it in the wrong places. We expect obvious, observable cause and effect when often the changes is more subtle, maybe too subtle to see.

Cause and effect

It’s not an ideal comparison, but no one anticipated the emergence of fish and chips when entrepreneurs built Britain’s rail network.

Railways made fast fish delivery to inland towns possible. Overnight ordinary people had access to better1 and cheaper food.

Railways ran to a timetable. Which spawned a need for clocks and watches so people could meet trains on time. Before long people realised they could commute to work and live further from city centres.

None of this was thought about when the railways were built.

We didn’t anticipate online media and advertising or streaming when the internet first appeared.

Hidden transformation

It’s possible the transformational effects of fibre are already happening. We can’t see them yet. Or maybe the network has to hit a critical mass before transformation kicks in. Either way, we’re going to get more than “Netflix in 4K”.

MacMahon’s other point is a bigger concern.

He says: “We also have a stubborn problem with digital inclusion. A lot of Kiwis don’t use the internet much or at all, particularly those who are older, rural, Māori, Pasifika, on low incomes, or have disabilities. In the 2018 census, 211,000 households (13 percent) stated they do not have internet access at home.

“It’s clear that lack of access to broadband is a diminishing issue. The main challenges are now affordability of broadband, motivation to use the internet, trust (for example in e-commerce) and skills. The government is still working on building a comprehensive blueprint to close the digital divide. In the meantime, many of the current initiatives are underfunded and sub-scale.”

Challenges

Yes. Big challenges indeed.

The cost of broadband has fallen in relative terms since the UFB project started. So has the cost of a device needed to access the network. This helps, but not enough.

When I wear my optimistic hat, I think we’re onto these challenges. There are useful initiatives. I know it concerns Kris Faafoi, the communications minister. If anyone can find a solution, he will.

In my darker moments I fear the problem is harder than we, as a nation, imagine. It may not even be about money.

The problems Spark encountered helping customers watch the Rugby World Cup show the digital divide is not just about the financial haves and have nots. There’s a skills gap and an information gap. Bridging all three is the challenge.

As an aside, I know only the first stage of the fibre network is done. Any other headline would have been too long. This isn’t the Daily Mail online. 


  1. Trust me, fish and chips was a diet upgrade at the time ↩︎

Vocus and Vodafone want cheaper fibre unbundling. If we take their words at face value, they want fibre wholesalers to sell at a loss.

That would be a disaster.

It would kill the fibre companies. They would go broke.

Unbundling on terms that would keep Vocus and Vodafone happy would unravel the telecommunications industry restructure that took place a decade ago as well as mess with the intent of the recent Telecommunications Amendment Act.

In the process, unbundling fibre in the way Vocus and Vodafone want would wipe out the small service providers. That may well be one of their goals. It threatens to undermine the entire broadband sector.

Unbundling means more expensive broadband

If all that sounds remote to readers who don’t work or invest in telecommunications, try this: if Vocus and Vodafone get their way, unbundling means most customers will pay more for broadband.

You could pay a lot more. We’ll come back to this later.

What looks like a simple squabble over price is the tip of a complex iceberg.

In June Vocus and Vodafone issued a press release (published in full at the bottom of this page) saying: “Chorus is torpedoing broadband innovation with predatory pricing”.

Predatory?

There is a curious thing about that sentence1. Vocus and Vodafone single out Chorus as the problem. No other fibre company is named.

Yet Chorus is only one of four New Zealand four fibre wholesale companies. Chorus’ unbundled fibre offer is the cheapest of the four. It is the most generous of the four. Some of the others want even more money.

To single out the cheapest, most amenable unbundled wholesaler, for special criticism is odd.

Presumably, it is because Chorus has the highest profile. Everyone has heard of Chorus. This tells us the Vocus and Vodafone press release is more about politics than informing the public or making a case. It is only there to mess with your head.

This is political. It always was. Unbundling was a political bolt-on to the fibre project. By law, All four fibre companies have to offer unbundled fibre from January 2020.

The law doesn’t say anything about the price or the unbundling process. These are not regulated at this stage.

Ideally, the politicians, regulators and government officials would prefer the industry to sort out fibre unbundling terms through commercial negotiations. If that doesn’t work, then the regulator steps in.

Going by the language in the press release, we’re already at that point or close to it.

Background

Unbundling fibre sounds simple. It isn’t.

First, there’s the question of the integrity of the fibre network. Fibre companies worry that letting outsiders cut their glass strands could be chaotic.

As things stand that’s not going to happen. Yet it was an early bone of contention.

A harder problem is how to price unbundled fibre so that networks cover their costs and earn a fair return for their investors. It looks as if this can’t be done in a way that would satisfy Vocus and Vodafone.

Layers

Today, New Zealand’s fibre companies offer what is known as bitstream or layer 2 services. You don’t need to worry about all the layers. Unbundled fibre is layer 1.

Layer 1 is an active fibre link between two points and layer 2 is where there are electronics at both ends to handle the traffic.

Regulations mean wholesale fibre companies cannot sell directly to end-users. They sell to retail service providers or RSPs like Vocus, Vodafone and Spark. At the moment wholesalers only sell layer 2 services.

Regulations

The price of a basic wholesale fibre service is fixed and regulated at $42 a month.

The regulated price of fibre is based on an estimate of the cost to the wholesaler of providing the service.

That cost includes the investment a fibre company made building the network and then providing continuing services. The biggest cost component is civil engineering.

There’s a formula that looks at what the regulator describes as allowable input costs’.

This is quite different from the way regulated costs were determined for the copper network. That was based on benchmarking against costs for similar networks overseas.

The new method gives fibre companies more certainty and makes it easier for them to judge the worth of further network investments. If we didn’t use this method or something like it, then there would have been few takers to build the networks.

Not much price difference

Fibre wholesalers can and do offer faster speeds at unregulated prices. As you’d imagine, these unregulated prices are higher. A gigabit line costs around $60.

There is not much cost difference between providing a basic fibre broadband plan and delivering the fastest speeds available.

Almost all of the cost of providing a fibre connection is in the engineering, digging trenches and running cables from poles. A fibre company needs to dig the same trenches and roll out the same cable regardless of the line speed or who owns the hardware at each end.

The only significant input cost difference between a bundled and unbundled line is the equipment at each end of the fibre.

Unbundled service providers buy their own hardware. Fibre wholesalers wrap the cost of this hardware into their layer 2 prices. A little extra money may be needed to cover the costs of dealing with more data passing through the network, but that’s near negligible.

At most, the total extra input cost of providing a fast connection is a couple of dollars. Likewise, the only saving the wholesaler makes with an unbundled line is not buying this equipment. In other words, for a wholesaler, the cost difference between delivering layer 1 and layer 2 is marginal.

Cost-based pricing

At most, the practical cost to a wholesaler of providing an unbundled fibre line is a dollar or two less than the cost of providing a bundled line. This explains why the fibre companies have come up with the unbundled prices you see today.

Vocus and Vodafone don’t like these prices, but they have been arrived at using the same logic as the regulated layer 2 prices.

To argue against these unbundled prices is to argue against the regulated model established by the government. If Vocus and Vodafone have an argument, it is with the Commerce Commission, Crown Infrastructure Holdings and maybe the government itself.

That’s where any anger should be directed. Given the success of the UFB project, they are unlikely to get anywhere attacking the government organisations, but they need a target for publicity purposes.

If the big service providers unpick the unbundled fibre price, they unpick the entire regulatory structure. This means upsetting a regime that works.

It also swipes the financial legs from under the fibre companies.

Margins

Wholesale fibre companies make better margins from selling faster, connections where the prices are not regulated. Overall fibre company margins are good enough to keep investors interested.

As we’ve seen, wholesaler input costs are much the same whatever a customer’s connection speed. But the value delivered to a customer rises as the speed rises. Hence people willingly pay more for faster broadband.

In New Zealand, the price difference between a basic fibre service and the fastest service is less than in most overseas markets.

That’s important because you could argue customers who buy faster broadband plans, 100 Mbps or 1Gbps services, subsidise people on basic plans.

Using today’s technology fibre lines can typically work at up to 10Gbps. The cost of 10Gbps circuit hardware is not 300 times the cost of 30mbps hardware but it will run at 300 times the speed.

10Gbps unbundling demonstration 

At a press function, Vocus and Vodafone used a 10Gbps connection to demonstrate the potential of unbundling.

When they buy an unbundled line, they are, in effect already buying a 10Gbps connection for less than the regulated cost of a 30mbps connection. They know the cost of providing 10Gbps is only fractionally higher than a 30mbps connection.

This is a form of arbitrage, they can buy something cheap, spend next to nothing turning it into something expensive.

Unbundling connections, then bumping the speed to 10Gbps, makes it hard for fibre companies to operate a price structure where the low margin lines that make up the bulk of their business are offset by a small number of more lucrative options.

Making that unbundled connection price cheaper still would undermine layer 2 services. It would remove all the cream from fibre company revenues.

Basic fibre service margins are thin.

If enough customers buy connections from unbundled service providers, fibre company revenue will fall.

Regulatory goals

Let’s go back and look at the points made at the top of the story.

Should it intervene, the Commerce Commission is unlikely to set the regulated price of an unbundled connection at a level where fibre companies lose money.

If they did, they’d have to raise the price of regulated layer 2 services to a level where the fibre companies still make enough money to keep everything ticking over. That means higher broadband prices for everyone.

Media release

21 June 2019

Vocus, Vodafone welcome Commerce Commission scrutiny on unbundled broadband pricing

Telecommunications operators Vocus Group and Vodafone have made clear their belief that Chorus is torpedoing broadband innovation with predatory pricing, and labelled a proposed Chorus price drop of 15c a month ‘pathetic’.

The companies have welcomed action from the Commerce Commission announced last week which will clarify legal interpretations of Chorus’ obligations to provide commercially viable unbundled access to the Ultra-Fast Broadband network.

Vocus and Vodafone demonstrated an unbundled UFB connection in February and then sought commercial pricing from Chorus in preparation for a launch in 2020.

After multiple delays, and despite a deadline of December 2018, Chorus announced wholesale pricing for unbundled connections in April of this year. Vocus and Vodafone protested the pricing as ‘cynical and protectionist’, noting that it exceeded that of bundled connections.

The companies approached the Commerce Commission with their views, backed by an independent assessment by Network Strategies which demonstrated the cost to third parties should have been less than 50 percent of that proposed by Chorus.

Yesterday Chorus released a new proposed pricing model that was just 15cents a month lower than its original pricing.

This month, the Commerce Commission noted[1] that it has the authority to assess whether offers (pricing) made by Chorus and the LFCs comply with their respective obligations under the Telecommunications Act of 2001. It has advised Vocus and Vodafone that ‘If we consider that a breach of the Fibre Deeds is likely to occur or has occurred, we will decide whether to bring enforcement action’.

“This is a step in the right direction, and we welcome the attention that the Commerce Commission is giving to the issue,” says Vocus Group Chief Executive Mark Callander.

“We have to remember that Chorus benefited from a billion-dollar interest free loan from the government. That means every New Zealander should get the best possible benefit from the UFB network, and unbundling is the key to unlocking innovation that drives those benefits.

“Today Chorus proposed a new price that was merely 15 cents a month lower. That’s outrageous, pathetic and quite frankly insulting.”

‘Unbundling’ allows third parties like Vocus and Vodafone to use their own equipment at the end of a Chorus or LFC owned fibre line. Innovation including the creation of new and faster services is possible, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach to market.

“The problem right now is simple. Pricing makes or breaks the business case for unbundled access,” says Vodafone Chief Executive Jason Paris. “The proposed numbers make unbundling impossible. And that restricts innovation, denying New Zealanders their right to the best value from the investment of their tax dollars in the UFB network.”

The Commerce Commission has committed to look into the matter in the coming months.

Callander has welcomed the Commission’s work, but notes that the Vocus and Vodafone have made clear their intention of introducing an unbundled service by January 2020, and that a suitable price needs to be determined quickly. “Right now, the country’s investment in UFB is stranded in the hands of the Chorus monopoly.

We’re confident that the Commerce Commission will find that Chorus is expected to act in the best interests of customers – and pricing is something we’re all sensitive to.”


  1. Make that two curious things. How can you innovate with broadband? Almost all your ‘innovation’ options involve impeding the speed. ↩︎

Research company Gartner predicts that by the end of 2021, 70 percent of large enterprises will rely solely on the internet for their wide area network connectivity for small and remote branch offices. This is twice the number of enterprises who connected this way in 2017.

A report, How to Use the Internet for Cloud Connectivity Without Performance Disasters, by Australian-based analysts Bjarne Munch and Padraig Byrne says: “We are now seeing enterprises introducing an internet-first strategy for their WANs. This will also incorporate consumer-grade internet services, where possible.”

In other words, where they can companies are dropping expensive WAN products and jumping on to services like New Zealand’s UFB.

In some cases they use the same consumer services as residential users, in other cases, they use slightly more expensive business-class fibre services. The main difference between the two is the lack of contention on business services, although this isn’t a problem for users in New Zealand.

Business-class fibre services also usually come with better support.

As the name of the Gartner report suggests, the focus here is using the internet to connect to cloud services.

There are many nuances for businesses wanting to get the best performance from an internet service provider. For New Zealand companies one potential problem is the lack of alternative routes to cloud services. Another issue to consider is whether the service offers direct peering to the cloud services you require.

One interesting point made by the Gartner analysts is that many companies now want to include wireless broadband in their connectivity mix. Or as Munch and Byrne put it:

“Mobile broadband is increasingly included for truly diverse access designs.”

It’s a great option when companies have employees on the move, but it shouldn’t be a first choice for cloud connectivity. As the report says: “These are generally asymmetric and have unpredictable overbooking.”

You may be right if you think you’re not ready for or don’t need 10Gbps residential broadband. For now, it’s a niche product for a niche market.

Yet it won’t be long before it is mainstream.

Next month, New Zealanders will be able to test the world’s fastest residential broadband. From mid-March, 30 volunteers will get early access to 10Gbps on the Chorus fibre network.

It’s not the world’s first residential 10Gbps service. Singapore already has 10Gbps. Yet Chorus is early to the technology.

Now is the time for 10Gbps

There are good reasons to start testing now.

First, New Zealand’s UFB fibre infrastructure is ready for faster services. That was the plan from the outset. Moving to 10Gbps means new equipment at either end of the fibre. It’s an upgrade.

Second, it’s good to be ahead of the demand curve. When UFB was first dreamed up, planners expected one in five people who could get fibre to take it up by 2020.

Today, roughly half the people who can connect to fibre do. That number is set to increase as we get closer to the Rugby World Cup.

There are reasons why uptake is greater than expected. Netflix and Lightbox are the usual suspects. But that’s immaterial. The point is fibre growth has been well ahead of predicted demand curves. The same could be true for 10Gbps.

Prestige

Another, less tangible, reason to get cracking with 10Gbps is prestige.
New Zealand would be among only a handful of countries to offer the service. It’s a testament to our network and planners that we get there early.

On a more practical level, Chorus managed to announce its service ahead of competitors. It faces a form of competition from ISPs who want to unbundle fibre. Offering a faster 10Gbps service was one way an unbundler might have differentiated. That’s no longer an option.

Likewise, 10Gbps puts clear blue water between UFB fibre and fixed wireless broadband. When 5G arrives, it, in theory, could offer wireless data speeds that match today’s best UFB speeds.

On paper the 5G specification could see 10Gbps fixed wireless services. That is years off. Apart from anything else, it needs more spectrum than is available to cellular companies either now or after the next round of auctions.

Get ready for 10Gbps

A more subtle point is that having 10Gbps now encourages customers to prepare for faster broadband.

As things stand few homes can make full use of the speed. Devices operating at 10Gbps are scarce. The line speed is much faster than home wi-fi networks. You can buy network storage devices that run at 10Gbps, but slower speeds are more common.

Even among the homes that have wired networks, many can’t handle 10Gbps at the moment. The most popular residential Ethernet routers offer 1Gbps.

That’s why Chorus is being picky about who can take part in its test run.
Chorus is looking for 30 volunteers. Candidates need to already have a 1Gbps plan with one of the partner RSPs.

Chorus is a wholesale broadband provider. That means it can only serve 10Gbps broadband through one of its retail partners. Kordia, 2degrees, Trustpower and Stuff Fibre are among the first to sign up. Others will follow.

Test pilots have to live in one of three Chorus exchange areas. That’s Johnsonville in Wellington, Avondale and Birkenhead in Auckland.
Another must-have is a device with a 10Gbps port. Trialists will need to agree to provide feedback on the service.

Big (home) data

The trial is most suitable for people who work with large data files, say movies or high-quality audio. It may also be useful for homes with some high-end gamers or use other demanding applications.

The Chorus 10Gbps trial is a collaborative project. It will use Nokia’s XGS-PON (passive optical network) fibre technology.

Chorus chief customer officer, Ed Hyde says 10Gbps underpins New Zealand’s digital future. He says it will “continue our decade long commitment to innovation and keeping New Zealand’s broadband infrastructure at the cutting edge.”

If the trial is a success, Chorus aims to roll out the service nationwide. You can take that as read. It may not be everywhere this year, but it’s coming.

While Bill Bennett edits The Download magazine and a weekly newsletter for Chorus, this post is an independent opinion.