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NZ cities innovation

London, New York and Tokyo top the 2017 Innovation Cities index. Auckland limps in at a feeble 89. Wellington rates at 108.

An organisation called 2thinknow released the index. No, I’ve never heard of it either. It describes itself as a “global innovation agency”, whatever that means.

According to 2thinknow the index scores 500 cities using 162 indicators for measuring conditions conducive to creating innovation in a city.

It says the top 50 cities, which includes Sydney and Melbourne – 2thinknow’s home, are nexus cities. Auckland and Wellington sit in the second, hub, band. Below that are node cities. 

Yes. You’ve guessed it. The 2thinknow survey is meaningless. There is no need to take it seriously, but no doubt someone will see it and worry.

Rod Drury AWS Summit Auckland 2015

If you’re wondering why the government was so keen to build a fibre network look no further than Victoria White’s Xero boss brings jobs to Hawke’s Bay in Hawke’s Bay Today. She writes:

Next year, Hawke’s Bay will join the likes of San Francisco, London, and Singapore, as a base for global software company Xero.

The ever-expanding company will be opening a new office in Napier — potentially at the new Ahuriri Tech Hub — which will create 30 support jobs over the next 18 months to join the company’s global customer experience team and specialist payroll experts.

The story is mainly concerned with Hawke’s Bay potential for acting as a hub for other technology companies. That’s as it should be for a Hawke’s Bay newspaper. Good luck with that project, the more tech jobs in regional New Zealand the better. Xero is already helping to pull the national technology economy along.

Three-quarters of the way down the page, White gets to the important point. She quotes Hawke’s Bay-based MP and Small Business Minister Craig Foss, who says:

“Fibre has enabled world-leading innovative companies, such as Xero, to be based in our stunning region – living and working the dream.”

Tuanz CEO Craig Young makes the same point in a Tweet:

More initiatives like this please.

James RosenwaxJames Rosenwax says Auckland should focus on agility and the knowledge economy as it continues to emerge as a dynamic global city.

Rosenwax leads Aecom’s Australia and New Zealand cities practice. He recently authored a report on using innovation to transform Australian cities.

He says Auckland is already on the radar for many of the world’s major companies.

The Economist Intelligence Unit rates Auckland as the world’s eighth most liveable city. Yet Rosenwax says being seventh on the Jones Lang LaSalle Investment Intensity Index is more important.

“The JLL index is a measure of a city’s ability to attract investment from global corporations”, he says.

Read the full story by Bill Bennett in the New Zealand Herald.

Sixty-nine chief executives responded to an open-ended question as to what they would like to see from the Labour Shadow Finance Minister Grant Robertson in terms of policy.

“Continue to constrain public expenditure to core and effective services,” advised Unitec CRO Rick Ede. “Reset taxation and investment incentives to favour productive investment instead of property investment.

“Continue the investment approach to welfare services begun by Bill English.”

Many, but not all, of the themes on Robertson’s own priority list resonate with the boardroom. With 67 per cent per cent of CEOs predicting technological advances will be the single factor with the biggest impact on business in the next five years and a further 7 percent singling out job losses through technology, it is clear Robertson’s Future of Work initiative falls on fertile ground.

Read the full story by Bill Bennett in the New Zealand Herald.

Robertson’s four priorities:

• Find ways for industry to add value and diversify the economy: lift productivity and add value to primary industry and invest more in R&D.

• Focus on regional development and lift wages outside the main centres. Auckland’s infrastructure and housing is under pressure. Housing costs less in the regions but there are not enough good jobs.

• Future of Work project to address the challenge of technology-led change head-on.

• Share the rewards from prosperity: many people work hard and yet they don’t earn enough to buy a house.

“When I attend a business dinner, the conversation often turns to inequality. Many business leaders are concerned about this. They realise it can mean both a loss of potential and it can become a drain on the economy. Even organisations like the OECD, which is hardly a left-wing body, recognises that inequality inhibits growth,” says Robertson.