Jack Schofield charts the background to how Google Plus failed to make it into the social networking Premier League. He then looks at how things might go in the future. He writes:

G+ started out as a slow, bloated website, it attempted to gain users by compulsion — locking G+ to YouTube comments, Gmail and other Google properties — and it tried to enforce the use of real names…

All of these were unpopular with many users…

The clincher is in his conclusion:

G+ might have done better if it hadn’t been delusional about replacing Facebook, and aimed at providing something that users — rather than Google — actually needed.

There are useful things in Google Plus. Google Hangouts are OK even though I’ve struggled to get them working as well as FaceTime or Skype. However, there’s no logical reason Hangouts should be part of Google Plus and not a stand-alone app or, possibly, integrated into Gmail.

Google Plus is turning negative, but don’t bet on it going away | ZDNet.